Crime scene photography

Crime scene photography - The dead body should be carefully lifted and placed on to a bed sheet, length of plastic or body bag and wrapped for transport. With heavy bodies, decomposed or fragile remains, the body should be rolled on to its side and the plastic stuck underneath the body.

The body can then be lifted using the plastic to hold the remains intact. In case of suicide by firearms, paper bags are placed securely over the hands. They should show

(1) General relations of the scene of body to its surroundings.

(2) Special relationships between the deceased and weapon or blood stains, overturned furniture, etc.

(3) Means of possible entrance to and exit from the scene.

(4) Position and posture of the victim.

Take a scaled crime scene photography as it was first viewed. A second scaled photograph should be taken, locating in the field of camera with suitable markers any small objects, such as fired cartridge case, bullet holes in walls, etc. A scaled drawing of the room or the area of interest in the investigation should be made. The dead body should be photographed from different angles.

Crime scene photography of all injuries, major and minor are essential. The skin should be cleaned of blood, dirt or foreign material. A ruler and case number or other identifying information must be present in the photograph of the injury. The ruler should be placed on the skin surface adjacent to the injury at the same height as the injury.

The crime scene photography must be taken with the camera perpendicular to the skin surface. The injury should fill most of the picture area. To indicate important features, markers or pointers can be inserted. If the powder residues are on the victim’s skin, a scaled photograph should be made, including the entire area over which the powder residues exist.

Photographs help the investigating officer and the doctor to refresh their memories for giving evidence in the Court. Crime scene photography also convey essential facts to the Court.